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Newspaper headlines: A big day for May

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Newspaper headlines: A big day for May


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The Daily Express is among several papers to look ahead to the prime minister’s speech at the Conservative Party conference – reporting Theresa May is to make a call for the UK to pull together in the national interest and build a post-Brexit future that is “full of promise”.

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The Metro says Mrs May will brush off weeks of Tory in-fighting over the Brexit negotiations with her speech titled “the future is in our hands”.

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The Times says the prime minister will seek to rally her divided party and country and outline an upbeat vision in her speech.

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The Sun says Theresa May is also to reveal that fuel duty will be frozen again in this month’s budget. The paper sees it as a bid to persuade voters to stick with her.

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However, the Daily Telegraph reports Theresa May is under pressure from members of her cabinet to set out a timetable for her departure as prime minister. It says discussions have begun about when she should be ousted if she refuses to leave before the next general election in 2022.

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The i focuses on Boris Johnson’s speech during the conference on Tuesday – noting that Theresa May hit back, saying his plans for Brexit would “tear up” the UK.

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The Daily Mail says the PM turned on Boris Johnson as the ex-foreign secretary “staged a public audition for his job” with his speech in which he accused her of “cheating” voters on Brexit. In a front page comment piece, the Mail says Mr Johnson has widened the party’s divisions.

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The Guardian says Mrs May will seek to reassert her authority in an effort to halt Mr Johnson’s leadership bid by declaring the Tories can represent the “decent, moderate and patriotic”.

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The Daily Mirror reports members of a Conservative students society face being suspended from the party after wearing offensive T-shirts on a night out.

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The Financial Times leads with Amazon’s decision to increase the minimum wage it pays to staff in the UK and US – reporting the internet giant is “passing on some of the spoils of its expanding empire” in the face of political criticism.

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The Daily Star leads on the decision by the University of Manchester student union to ban clapping because it can cause issues for students with autism, sensory issues or deafness.

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